Movie Review: Still Alice (2014)- An Earnest and Occasionally Devastating Illustration of Disease that Makes Up for Bland Direction and a One Dimensional Narrative with a Gripping Performance

An unfortunate part of the human condition is the deterioration of our mortal bodies where the development of maladies—some more debilitating and horrifying than others—erode our known sense of self that eventually leaves behind an empty shell of our former being. The cruelest of illnesses might be Alzheimer’s; an unstoppable attack of mental attrition that … Continue reading

Movie Review: Wild (2014)- A Beautifully Resilient yet Occasionally Flawed Cinematic Journey of Feminist Strength, Personal Acceptance, and Transcendental Freedom

Nature is an elusive entity; an aspect of life that has mystified us with its insurmountable beauty, promised us peaceful solitude and transcendental freedom for those willing to attain it, and has served up harsh realities due to its unforgiving changes that prove that underestimating its force can be a tragic downfall. It seems nature … Continue reading

Movie Review: The Imitation Game (2014)- A Standard British Drama That Finds Modern Significance in its Occasionally Simplistic Character Study

Nothing is more tragic than witnessing the bright light of a promising mind—creative, intellectual, or otherwise—being snuffed out far before their time and even more tragic when the reasons behind their end are a result of thoroughly antiquated, discriminatory, and unjust notions that have, for the most part, evolved over time. One of these elusive … Continue reading

Movie Review: The Homesman (2014)- An Uneven yet Devastating Feminist Critique of the Male-Centric Western that Deconstructs the Romanticism of the Genre

The prospect of the western frontier has always brought with it sweeping hope filled refrains of new beginnings, the freedom of opportunity, and the wonders of success that were explored with optimistic fervor in the classic worlds of John Ford, Raoul Walsh, and Howard Hawkes. However, these borderline naïve depictions of the west as an … Continue reading

Movie Review: Inherent Vice (2014)- Auteur Paul Thomas Anderson’s Latest is a Satirical Embodiment of the Post-Noir 70s that is Humorously Absurd, Allegorically Resonant, and A Product of Nostalgia Filmmaking

Anyone who has ever read a Thomas Pynchon novel knows that it’s quite the daunting task as his ambitious storytelling is guided by an articulate yet passive prose that randomly maneuvers through an ethereal haze of eccentric characters, a detailed tapestry of literary influences, and a blend of varying expressionistic tones. These qualities sound vaguely … Continue reading

Movie Review: Foxcatcher (2014)- Bennett Miller’s Atmospheric and Understated Thriller Showcases Refined Performances but Misses the Mark in Thematic Relevance

The elusive concept of the American Dream has become a sort of repetitive target for the realm of cinema mostly because, like all ideals, there are cracks to be exposed and tragedies that showcase its failures either in focusing on the inability to achieve its benefits or focusing on those who abuse its possibilities. Ever … Continue reading

Movie Review: The Theory of Everything (2014)- A Formulaic Biopic Structure is Fortunately Lifted by Immaculate Performance, Confident Direction, and its Reflection on an Unequal Marriage

It’s quite a coincidental occurrence of random Universal existence that Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar, a space epic that confidentially explores theoretical physics postured in part by cosmologist Stephen Hawking, is released the same weekend as James Marsh’s Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything. Really the two films couldn’t be any different from the other as … Continue reading

Movie Review: Interstellar (2014)- Christopher Nolan’s Self-Indulgent Visual Extravagance Can’t Save an Interminable and Familiar Narrative

It seems fitting that director Christopher Nolan, a filmmaker obsessed with the more cerebral slanting elements of film, would ambitiously attempt to tackle the vastness of our Universe and its infinitely changing properties because in most of his original pieces of film he has already bent time (Memento), manipulated space (The Prestige), and created new … Continue reading

Movie Review: Nightcrawler (2014)- Dan Gilroy’s Directorial Debut is an Entertaining and Unsettling Look into Exploitative Journalism

It takes a special kind of cynic to practice the modern news slant towards local violence because in a world where crime is going down and the reporting of it is going drastically up one can only see the tactic as the packaging of fear as a product to be consumed. And what is Fear? … Continue reading

Movie Review: Fury (2014)- An Unrelenting Barrage of War Brutality That Misses the Mark Due to Self-Important Ethics and a Collision of Thematic Intent

“Ideals are peaceful, history is violent,” states the disillusioned yet stubbornly principled Sergeant Don “Wardaddy” Collier (Brad Pitt) somewhere in the drawn out middle of writer/director David Ayer’s new film Fury, a sentiment that carries with it a promise that what follows in this casually brutal and slightly trite World War II epic is violence … Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38 other followers